Dozens of Southwest flights canceled at Las Vegas airport

Dozens of Southwest Airlines flights were canceled at Harry Reid International Airport in Las Vegas on Friday, and hundreds more were canceled across the country due to the COVID-19 pandemic and stormy weather.

Airport spokeswoman Christine Crews said 18 flights to the southwest were canceled at 5 a.m. on Friday. There were also 16 crossed out starts. Nationwide, the Dallas-based airline canceled more than 500 flights as of Friday morning, the Dallas Morning News reported.

“Track the status of your flight with your airline before you go to the airport,” Crews said. “You’d rather deal with customer service over the phone, on the Internet or from your hotel room rather than standing in line at the airport. Your airline will have the most recent information.

Overall, at least 34 flights to Reid for domestic and international travel were canceled or delayed on Friday, according to online tracker FlightView. This figure applied to all airlines, not just Southwest.

Meanwhile, the Associated Press said the outbreak of the omicron variant and COVID-19 resulted in the cancellation of more than 2,100 U.S. flights by early Thursday evening on the east coast.

Tracking service FlightAware said this equated to about 8% of the day’s scheduled flights, and it was the 12th day in a row of more than 1,000 cancellations, which airlines blamed on the virus wave and conditions. winter weather.

Southwest was one of the hardest hit airlines on Thursday, canceling about 650 flights, or 21% of its schedule by early evening. A spokesperson said the airline was facing extreme cold at several airports and a high number of calls from employees who were either sick with COVID-19 or in isolation after close contact with someone infected with the virus.

Flight cancellations in the United States began to increase on Christmas Eve and peaked at more than 3,200 on Monday, or about one in eight flights.

Contact Glenn Puit by email at [email protected] To follow @GlennatRJ on Twitter.



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